Roll Call: 9 South African Infantry Regiment

Programme Notes: CTMT 2004

“9 SAI, whose officers and men are taking part in two major acts of the 2004 Cape Town Military Tattoo (the “Unity in Diversity” continuation drill act and the “Soldiers’ Race”) is the only Regular Force infantry unit in the Western Cape and and is headquartered at the former SA Cape Corps base near Somerset West. Although a young unit – it was formed in April 1992 after the deactivation of the SA Cape Corps – it has already played an active and valuable role in the development of the country in the past 12 years.

After 1994, it was deeply involved in the extremely ticklish task of welding personnel from the SA Defence Force, Umkhonto we Sizwe, the Azanian People’s Liberation Army and the defence forces of the four former “homelands” into a seamless new unit of the SA National Defence Force. Since then its soldiers have served on peace intervention missions and have frequently aided the civil power in the fight against crime and violence. But like any good regiment, it also likes to show off its ceremonial skills, and gladly volunteered to provide both halberdiers and assegai men for the “Unity in Diversity” act as well as a mortar section for the “Soldiers’ Race”.

Although young in years, 9 SAI is solidly rooted in the Cape military heritage. Its badge is a lion, which not only symbolises power and courage but is also a conscious link to the lions atop the pillars of the Lion Gate, the outer entrance to the Castle; and the three arrows grasped in the lion’s left paw commemorate the three SA Cape Corps units that provided the foundation of the new regiment in 1992.” (CTMT 2004)

 

Programme Notes: CTMT 2007

14-9-sai-2“9 SAI is the only Regular Force infantry unit in the Western Cape and and is headquartered at the former South African Cape Corps base near Somerset West. Although a young unit – it was formed in April 1992 – it has already played an active and valuable role in the development of the country.

After 1994, it was deeply involved in the extremely ticklish task of welding personnel from the various armed forces and organisations into a seamless unit of the new SA National Defence Force. Since then its soldiers have served on peace intervention missions abroad and frequently aided the civil power in the fight against crime and violence.” (CTMT 2007)