Roll Call: Regiment Westelike Provincie

Programme Notes: CTMT 2003

“Regiment Westelike Provincie, originally a machine-gun battalion and now a mechanised infantry regiment of the South African Army, was established in 1934 during a consolidation of a number of small rural light infantry and mounted rifle units. Since then it has been an active participant in all of South Africa’s military activities, its first taste of action coming when it supplied armoured-car personnel for the Western Desert Campaign of World War II.

A strongly traditional-minded unit, RWP’s headdress badge depicts the Cape silvertree, first worn at the beginning of the 19th century by an earlier Volunteer military unit, and its distinctive parade uniform is modelled on that worn in 1934, complete with sun helmet and shorts.

The RWP Band was established in in the mid-1990s, and rapidly established a reputation for excellence, many of the bandsmen being former professionals.” (CTMT 2003)

 

Programme Notes: CTMT 2004

“Regiment Westelike Provincie, originally a machine-gun battalion and now a mechanised infantry regiment of the South African Army, was established in 1934 during a consolidation of a number of small rural light infantry and mounted rifle units. Since then it has been an active participant in all of South Africa’s military activities, its first taste of action coming when it supplied armoured-car personnel for the Western Desert Campaign of World War II, many of its members also seeing service in the ensuing Italian Campaign.

A strongly tradition-minded unit, RWP’s headdress badge depicts the unique Cape silver tree, an insignia first worn at the beginning of the 19th century by an early volunteer military unit, and its distinctive parade uniform is modelled on that worn in 1934, complete with sun helmet and shorts. By tradition the buttons are black, the commemorate the smaller light infantry and rifle regiments from which it was formed, but its headdress badge is silver in memory of its armoured service during World War II, and its particular “quiff” is to spell “Provincie” with a “c” instead of an “s”, in the old style.” (CTMT 2004)