Roll Call: SA Army Band Western Cape

Programme Notes: CTMT 2003

“The South African Army Band, Cape Town, is the country’s oldest Regular Force band. It originated in 1915 as the regimental band of the 1st Battalion The Cape Corps, a famous fighting unit of World War l. When the Corps was deactivated in 1919, the band continued on a part-time basis and became a well-known feature of Cape Town life. When the Cape Corps was reactivated at the outbreak of World War II, the band was the first element to return to full-time service.

After World War II, the Cape Corps was partly deactivated once more and the band returned to part-time status, but when the regiment was brought back to full-time status in 1965, the band went with it. It attained such excellence that in 1990 it became the staff band for the entire Western Cape.

The Cape Corps was deactivated again in 1991, but the band was retained and has gone from strength to strength, under the baton of Captain Chris Nicholls, a classically trained flautist who was appointed Director of Music in 1990. It is justly renowned for its excellence and its wide repertoire of music, ranging from orthodox military marches to classical, romantic, pop, avant-garde and ‘big band’ music.” (CTMT 2003)

Programme Notes: CTMT 2004

“The South African Army Band, Cape Town, is the country’s oldest Regular Force band. It originated in 1915 as the regimental band of the 1st Battalion The Cape Corps, a famous fighting unit of World War l. When the Corps was deactivated in 1919, the band continued on a part-time basis as a living memorial, and when the Cape Corps was reactivated at the outbreak of World War II, the band was the first element to return to full-time service.

After the war, the Cape Corps was partly deactivated once more and the band returned to part-time status, but when the regiment returned to full-time status in 1965, the band went with it. It attained such excellence that in 1990 it became the staff band for the entire Western Cape.

The Cape Corps was deactivated again in 1992, but the band was retained as one of the five regional SA Army bands. Under Major Chris Nicholls, a classically trained flautist who was appointed Director of Music in 1990, it has become justly renowned with a repertoire ranging from orthodox military marches to classical, romantic, pop, avant-garde and ‘big band’ music.” (CTMT 2004)

Programme Notes: CTMT 2007

09-massed-military-bands-9“The renowned South African Army Band, Cape Town, is the country’s oldest Regular Force band. It originated in 1915 as the regimental band of the 1st Battalion, the Cape Corps, a famous fighting unit of World War l. Today it is one of five regional South African Army Regular Force bands. It has an extensive repertoire, ranging from orthodox military items to classical, romantic, pop, avant-garde and ‘big band’ music. The Director of Music is Capt Martin Chandler, who has served in the band for many years.” (CTMT 2007)

 

Programme Notes: CTMT 2008

img_7987“The South African Army Band Cape Town is the most senior Regular Force band in the country. The band was established in 1915 as the regimental band of the 1st Battalion, the Cape Corps, a famous fighting unit of World War l. When the Corps was deactivated in 1919, the band continued on a part-time basis, and when the Corps was reactivated at the start of World War II, the band was the first element to return to full-time service.

When the unit was partly deactivated once more in 1946, the band returned to part-time status but was re-established in 1965, when the band returned to a full-time footing. It gained such a reputation for excellence that in 1990 it became the Regular Force staff band for the Western Cape.

In 1992 the Cape Corps was deactivated again, but the band was retained as one of five regional South African Army bands. It has an extensive repertoire, ranging from orthodox military items to classical, romantic, pop, avant-garde and ‘big band’ music, and they also train bandsmen from other Southern African countries. The Director of Music is Captain Martin Chandler, who has served in the band for many years, and the Bandmaster is WO1 P. Jacobs.” (CTMT 2008)

 

Programme Notes: CTMT 2009

mvi_5230-5“The South African Army Band, Cape Town, is the country’s oldest Regular band. It originated in 1915 as the regimental band of the 1st Battalion The Cape Corps, a famous fighting unit of World War l. When the Cape Corps was deactivated in 1919, the band continued on a part-time basis, and when the Cape Corps was reactivated at the start of World War II, the band was the first element to return to full-time service.

In 1946, the Cape Corps was partly deactivated once more and the band returned to part-time status, but in 1965 the Cape Corps was re-formed and the band returned to a full-time footing. It gained such fame that in 1990 it became the Regular staff band for the Western Cape.

The Cape Corps was deactivated again in 1992, but the band was retained as one of the five regional South African Army bands. It has an extensive repertoire, ranging from orthodox military items to classical, romantic, pop, avant-garde and ‘big band’ music, and also trains bandsmen from surrounding countries. The Director of Music is Major Martin Chandler, who has served in the band for many years. His Bandmaster is Warrant Officer Class I A. van Schalkwyk.” (CTMT 2009)

 

Programme Notes: CTMT 2010

“The South African Army Band, Cape Town, is the country’s oldest Regular Force band. It originated in 1915 as the regimental band of the 1st Battalion, The Cape Corps, a famous fighting unit of World War l. When the Cape Corps was deactivated in 1919, the band continued on a part-time basis, and when the Cape Corps was reactivated at the start of World War II, the band was the first element to return to full-time service.

In 1946, the Cape Corps was partly deactivated once more and the band returned to part-time status, but in 1965 the Cape Corps was re-formed and the band returned to a full-time footing. It gained such fame that in 1990 it became the Regular staff band for the Western Cape.

The Cape Corps was deactivated again in 1992, but the band was retained as one of the five regional South African Army bands. It has an extensive repertoire ranging from orthodox military items to classical, romantic, pop, avant-garde and ‘big band’ music, and also trains bandsmen from surrounding countries. The Director of Music is Major Martin Chandler, who has served in the band for many years. His drum major is Warrant Officer Class 2 A. van Schalkwyk.” (CTMT 2010)

 

Programme Notes: CTMT 2012

“The South African Army Band, Cape Town, is the country’s oldest Regular Force band. It originated in 1915 as the regimental band of the 1st Battalion The Cape Corps, a famous fighting unit of World War l. When the Cape Corps was deactivated in 1919, the band continued on a part-time basis, and when the Cape Corps was reactivated at the start of World War II, the band was the first element to return to full-time service.

In 1946, the Cape Corps was partly deactivated once more and the band returned to part-time status, but in 1965 the Cape Corps was re-formed and the band returned to a full-time footing. It gained such fame that in 1990 it became the Regular staff band for the Western Cape.

The Cape Corps was deactivated again in 1992, but the band was retained as one of the five regional South African Army bands. It has an extensive repertoire ranging from orthodox military items to classical, romantic, pop, avant-garde and ‘big band’ music, and also trains bandsmen from neighbouring countries.” (CTMT 2012)

 

Programme Notes: CTMT 2013

“The South African Army Band Cape Town is the country’s oldest Regular Force band. It originated in 1915 as the regimental band of the 1st Battalion The Cape Corps, a famous fighting unit of World War l. When the Cape Corps was deactivated in 1919, the band continued on a part-time basis, and when the Cape Corps was reactivated at the start of World War II, the band was the first element to return to full-time service.

In 1946, the Cape Corps was partly deactivated once more and the band returned to part-time status, but in 1965 the Cape Corps was re-formed and the band returned to a full-time footing. It gained such fame that in 1990 it became the Regular staff band for the Western Cape.

The Cape Corps was deactivated again in 1992, but the band was retained as one of the five regional South African Army bands. It has an extensive repertoire ranging from orthodox military items to classical, romantic, pop, avant-garde and ‘big band’ music, and also trains bandsmen from surrounding countries. The Assistant Director of Music of the Army Band Cape Town is Captain Vernon Michels.” (CTMT 2013)

 

Programme Notes: CTMT 2014

“The South African Army Band Western Cape is the country’s oldest Regular Force band. It originated in 1915 as the regimental band of the 1st Battalion The Cape Corps, a famous fighting unit of World War l. When the Cape Corps was deactivated in 1919, the band continued on a part-time basis, and when the Cape Corps was reactivated at the start of World War II, the band was the first element to return to full-time service.

In 1946, the Cape Corps was partly deactivated once more and the band returned to part-time status, but in 1965 the Cape Corps was re-formed and the band returned to a full-time footing. It gained such fame that in 1990 it became the Regular staff band for the Western Cape.

The Cape Corps was deactivated again in 1992, but the band was retained as one of the five regional South African Army bands. It has an extensive repertoire ranging from orthodox military items to classical, romantic, pop, avant-garde and ‘big band’ music, and also trains bandsmen from surrounding countries.

During this year’s performance, the band will replicate a typical Zulu Impi attack with spectacular drill movements set to music.

The Director of Music of the Army Band Western Cape is Captain Vernon Michels. The Band Master and Drum Major is WO1 Andre van Schalkwyk.” (CTMT 2014)

 

Programme Notes: CTMT 2015

“The South African Army Band Western Cape is the country’s oldest Regular Force band. It originated in 1915 as the regimental band of the 1st Battalion of the Cape Corps, a famous fighting unit of World War I. When the Cape Corps was de-activated in 1919, the band continued on a part-time basis. When the Cape Corps was re-activated at the outbreak of World War II, the band was the first element to return to full-time service.

In 1946, the Cape Corps was partly de-activated and the band returned to part-time status. In 1965, when the Cape Corps was re-formed – now known as the SA Coloured Corps (SACC), the band returned once again to a full-time footing. It gained such fame that, in 1990, it became the Regular Force staff band for the Western Cape. The Cape Corps was de-activated again in 1992,  but the band was retained as one of the five regional SA Army bands. The band therefore celebrated 100 years of Military Music excellence with a Retreat Ceremony in March 2015.

It has an extensive repertoire, ranging from orthodox military items to classical, romantic, pop, avant-garde and ‘big band’ music, and also trains bandsmen from surrounding countries, which have included Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Rwanda, Congo Brazzaville, Namibia, Tanzania and Swaziland.

The band is widely known for their excellence on the parade ground and will demonstrate this by performing spectacular precision drill movements to equally spectacular music. The band will incorporate Drum Major mace drills, pace stick drills as well as band drills in this breath-taking performance.

The Director of Music of the SA Amy Band Western Cape is Captain Vernon Michels. The Band Master and Drum Major is WO1 André van Schalkwyk.” (CTMT 2015)