Roll Call: TS Woltemade Sea Cadets

Note

In the CTMT 2010, these were referred to as the SA Navy Sea Cadets. In 2014 and 2015, they were called the TS Woltemade Sea Cadets.

Programme Notes: CTMT 2010

“The SA Navy Sea Cadets is a registered Section 21 Company. It is recognised by the SA National Defence Force and the SA Navy assist in the training of the Cadets. The first training unit, referred to as a Training Ship, was established in Cape Town on 8 June 1905 on Woodstock Beach. The Training Ship offers character development and maritime skills training to the boys and girls.

The group is specially selected to participate in the Cape Town Military Tattoo 2010 to do this difficult continuation drill performance. These Cadets attend school most of the day and only have Saturdays to train. The training does not only consist of basic discipline and drill, but also includes seamanship, navigation, engineering, communication, catering and leadership to better equip them to meet the challenges of life.

They act without fear or favour in all their activities and uphold the values of honesty, loyalty, morality, respect, obedience, cooperation, conservation and unselfishness in all its dealings.” (CTMT 2010)

 

Programme Notes: CTMT 2014

“The Sea Cadet movement traces its origins back to the port of Whitstable in Kent, England in 1854. The success of the movement spread to Australia by 1855 and South Africa in 1905. The first Cape Town Naval Cadet Corps was opened on 8 June 1905 and located in a boat shed on Woodstock beach. Currently there are ten active Training Ships throughout South Africa, developing those values and skills required to ensure that the maritime industry is provided with recruits who have a passion for the sea.

The Cape Town unit adopted the name Training Ship (TS) Woltemade in 1968, and the drill squad on parade this year is from this Training Ship, which is located in Lakeside. Sea Cadets are school-going boys and girls from Grade 8 to 12 who enjoy having “serious fun”, whilst learning leadership, self-discipline and maritime orientated skills. Training takes place on Saturdays, with leadership camps scheduled during the school holidays. The highlight of the year is the annual camp hosted by the SA Navy in Simon’s Town.

Their motto ‘Honour and Skill’ is proudly displayed under their badge. These words embody the values of Respect, Honesty, Loyalty, Co-operation and Service, which are instilled in the Sea  Cadets via their training. The South African Sea Cadet Association is a Section 21 Company (Company Registration Number: 2025/026649/08) staffed by volunteers who have a passion for all things nautical. They are supported by local communities, parents, the maritime industry and the SA Navy. Funding is raised via the Sea Cadets’ annual fees and camp fees as well as via bequests, pledges and donations. Each Training Ship is staffed by competent volunteers, many of whom are themselves ex Sea Cadets or parents of Cadets, others who have followed careers within the maritime industry, SA Navy or have the skills that are needed to be imparted practically. Should you wish to contribute either financially or materially to the TS Woltemade South African Sea Cadets, please contact Lt Paul Jacobs on 083 674 1024 or pauljacobs15@gmail.com.” (CTMT 2014)

 

Programme Notes: CTMT 2015

“The Sea Cadet movement dates back to the port of Whitstable in Kent, England in 1854. Due to its success, the movement spread to Australia by 1855 and South Africa by 1905. The first Cape Town Naval Cadet Corps was opened on 8 June 1905 and located in a boat shed on Woodstock beach. Currently there are eight active training ships developing the values and skills required to ensure that the maritime industry is provided with recruits who have a passion for the sea.

The Cape Town unit adopted the name Training Ship (TS) Woltemade in 1968, and the cadets performing this evening are from this Training Ship, which is located in Lakeside. Sea Cadets are
school-going boys and girls from Grade 8 to 12 who enjoy having serious fun, while learning leadership, self-discipline and maritime orientated skills. Training takes place on Saturdays, with leadership camps scheduled during the school holidays. The highlight of the year is the annual camp hosted by the SA Navy in Simon’s Town.

Their motto ‘Honour and Skill’ is proudly displayed under their badge. These words embody the values of Respect, Honesty, Loyalty, Co-operation and Service, which are instilled in the Sea  Cadets via their training. The South African Sea Cadet Association is staffed by volunteers who have a passion for all things nautical. They are supported by local communities, parents, the maritime industry and the SA Navy. Funding is raised via the Sea Cadets’ annual fees and camp
fees as well as via bequests, pledges and donations.

Each Training Ship is staffed by competent volunteers, many of whom are themselves ex Sea  Cadets or parents of Cadets, or others who have followed careers within the maritime industry or in the South African Navy or who have the skills that are needed to be imparted practically.

During the Boer War, and up to and including World War I, members of the Royal Navy were called on to give artillery support to the British Army. This tradition was started when Boer soldiers besieged Ladysmith, Natal in 1899, and 280 naval personnel, from HMS Terrible, manhandled two six-pounder naval guns all the way from Durban to break the siege. What these Cadets from TS Woltemade are demonstrating is the fitness, coordination and team work required to manhandle an artillery piece, weighing close to 400kg in total, into position, under  fire. This Hotchkiss Naval Gun on an artillery carriage, seen here, is in itself a piece of history, as it also last saw action during the Boer War.” (CTMT 2015)